Free Curriculum- Parent Version, Teacher Version, Spanish Version

ImageI’m really excited about this free curriculum, “Sexuality Across the Lifespan” by: DiAnn L. Baxley and Anna L. Zendell.  It has versions for educators, teachers, and Spanish speakers.  You can view the curriculum by clicking on the links below.

What makes this special?  They do a nice job at adjusting lessons for different age groups, giving ideas for supplemental activities, and giving ideas for incorporating the topics into routines.  The parent version really focuses on how to reinforce healthy sexual development through interactions and daily routines.

This curriculum in not comprehensive but does have sections on social skills, dating, sexual abuse, puberty, and anatomy.  I hope you find this useful!

A Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism

“A Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism” is a wonderful resource and online community.  They have a blog, facebook page, and book so you can check them out in what ever way is most comfortable to you.  Although they deal with many topics related to Autism Spectrum Disorders, they often touch on topics of sexuality.

I especially would recommend checking out this post, “Talking About Sex with Young Adults with Autism”  Here’s an excerpt.

“Amy looked nice, but the grown-ups wouldn’t let us go in Amy’s room and shut the door.”

“Did Amy want to go in her room with you and shut the door?”

“Not really. So we went outside and the parents kept watching us.”

“Did Amy want to be alone with you outside?”

“I’m not sure.”

“Did you touch Amy?”

“I wanted to. I wanted her to lie down on the grass so we could do sex.”

“Have you ever had sex with anyone else?”

“Probably not.”

For Parents

In a parent focus group* on the topic of sexuality and their children with ASD several interesting themes emerged: parents struggle with what healthy sexuality looks like in their child with ASD, they feel their child’s social impairments make many sexuality topics difficult to understand, they feel the community does not understand the sexuality needs of their child, and they feel unprepared to support their child with their sexuality need.

Does that sound like you?

These researchers made several suggestions for parents.  Although they were focused on children with ASD, I think this would be applicable for almost all children.  I think they are also good things for professionals to keep in mind too!

1) Lean about sexuality and ASD as well as sexual development in general.

2) Think about your hopes and fears for your child.  Also think about your own experiences learning about sexuality.

3) Set goals for your child (and I would maybe modify, to the degree that they are able, with your child).

4) Think about the method to communicate these messages to your child.

5)  Coordinate with schools, physicians, ect.

I have found a book that may be useful called “Adolescents on the Autism Spectrum: A Parent’s Guide to the Cognitive, Social, Physical, and Transition Needs of Teenagers with Autism Spectrum Disorders “.  You can get a pretty good preview on google books to make sure it is right for you.  I like it because it talks about ASD in general and then weaves in topics related to puberty.  It also thinks about changes from multiple domains.  For example, one suggestion was realizing your teen might need more control and finding ways to incorporate that into his or her daily life.

This tip sheet from the Better Health Channel may also be helpful: Sex education for children with intellectual disabilities – tips for parents – Better Health Channel

*Only a short preview of this article is available for free online.  Although the entire article is available for purchase it is written for an academic audience.