Guest Room

Guest Room is a short film Written & Directed by Joshua Tate and starring Lauren Potter (“Glee”) and Michael Iovine (lovelandfilm.com).  It won the Audience Award (Competition Short) at SXSW 2015.

I think you are going to love this movie.  It’s beautiful, emotional, and honest.  I could easily see this being used in a human sexuality classroom to help discuss parenting, consent, and support from families.  It follows the story of a young couple who are faced in a situation many young couples find themselves in, an unexpected pregnancy.  Like many young couples, the response of their families  is shock and disappointment and this makes it difficult to determine their own feelings, hopes, and wants.

 

There was one statistic that was mentioned in the film that I had not heard before.  It said that a women with Down Syndrome has a 50% chance of having a child with Down Syndrome.  I did a little digging to see if I could find out more and received some help from The Tech Geneticist a  project from the University of Stanford which seeks to increase the public understanding of genetics.  About half of the eggs of a women with Down Syndrome will have an extra 21st chromosome (similar to what is described in this post http://genetics.thetech.org/ask/ask296).  Her actual chance of having a child with Down Syndrome is less than 50% because fetuses with extra 21st chromosomes are at increased risk of complications.  According to the National Down Syndrome Society only about 50% of women with Down Syndrome are fertile (ovulate).

It’s trickier when it comes to thinking about the father.  Much less is known about the heritability (chance of passing a genetic trait on) of Down Syndrome for men with Down Syndrome, but it may be that their sperm that carry two 21st chromosomes would be less viable than their sperm that only have one.  Both the Tech Geneticist and the National Down Syndrome Society suggested men with Down Syndrome seem to have much lower fertility rates than their same age peers with two 21st chromosomes.

 

Adult Human Sexuality Curriculum

These curricula materials are for educators working with young adults. It is a bit more in depth than the high school curriculum and discusses human sexuality in a broader sense.AdultHumanSexuality

Adult Human Sexuality Week 6- Physical Intimacy and Human Sexual Response

Relationship StagesThis activity was a little more difficult than we expected (I don’t know why I didn’t expect it to be hard- we’re talking about sexual activity after all!).  It was hard for us to explain each of the sexual activities.  Part of the point of this activity is to talk about the variety of sexual activities, but sometimes we get caught on our own hang ups and assumptions about what people need to know.  On the other hand, this material was difficult and new for many of the participants in the group.  Talking about sexual activities can make people feel uncomfortable.  I think, in the end we struck a nice balance between expressing the diversity of sexual expression and having opportunities to set personal boundaries.  I would make some revisions to the lesson plan and those revisions are reflected in the lesson.

We did a mini pretest which we revisited at the end.  The bulk of our activity involved sorting sexual activities into categories and talking about the continuum of intimacy.  The relationship categories really helped set up the continuum so I would recommend doing that step first (the relationship categories aren’t listed in order.  I would do it from left to right- outside a relationship, in a casual relationship, in a serious relationship, only if married or in a  lifelong partnership, and I don’t think I would ever do this).  I would then move into talking about how these activities have a continuum.  I changed the picture a little to better represent the continuum concept.

We then talked about the human sexual response cycle.  As we were talking we used the sexual activities to help make the sexual response cycle more concrete.

We ended with revisiting the pretest questions and talking about our own values.  Most of our group really values the emotional components of relationships.

In the newsletter there is a great video for human sexual response that you might want to check out 🙂

If you’re teaching human sexuality and would like to use these materials, go for it.

Materials this Week